Brevard students are seen as a future workforce for local space jobs

0

The space industry is taking off in Brevard County with thousands of new jobs as industry giants like SpaceX and Blue Origin ramp up their factories and rocket launches. Space Coast educators are striving to meet the growing talent needs that this expansion brings, and they are starting them young. “I would like to be an astronaut. And my mom also works at NASA building rockets,” said Harvey Satterlee, a kindergarten student at South Lake Elementary School. Harvey and his kindergarten classmates in Titusville are only 27 kilometers from Kennedy Space Center. 12 years ago, the school also closed due to lack of funding. There are so many different types of careers at Kennedy Space Center, at Lockheed Martin. They don’t just hire rocket scientists. They hire managers who can communicate effectively with each other. They hire electricians. They hire people who know a trade,” Rhonda Ripperger, host of South Lake’s Smart Lab, said. While some students can’t wait to get off the ground, some see other ways to work in space. Curiosity sparked by the ts experience and exposure in South Lake Teachers describe this as the start of the talent pool of bright minds they hope to stay in Brevard County or at least launch from it. that pipeline in south Brevard is Florida Tech. It was founded at the same time as NASA and has been preparing students for careers in space for decades. But it has gradually adapted to today’s fast pace of space. industry and rapid local expansion.While schools and universities across the United States may have programs to train and teach their students to excel in the new era of the spaceflight industry, Brevard schools like Florida Tech is working its home field advantage with industry leaders right next door. involved,” said Dona Gaynor of Florida Tech. Natalie Eustis has one of those opportunities. She is an intern at Boeing and worked on their Starliner capsule at Kennedy Space Center. who can solve the problems. It’s something that all of these engineering companies, NASA and Boeing, Blue Origin, SpaceX, are all looking for people to problem solve and think about,” Eustis said. Local schools and universities hope space companies are looking for these problem solvers look no further than Brevard’s local talent pool.

The space industry is taking off in Brevard County with thousands of new jobs as industry giants like SpaceX and Blue Origin ramp up their factories and rocket launches.

Space Coast educators are striving to meet the growing talent needs that this expansion brings, and they are starting them young.

“I would like to be an astronaut. And my mom also works at NASA building rockets,” said Harvey Satterlee, a kindergarten student at South Lake Elementary School.

Harvey and his kindergarten classmates in Titusville are only 27 kilometers from the Kennedy Space Center. A great location now, but when the space shuttle program was shut down 12 years ago, the school also closed due to lack of funding.

It reappeared alongside the commercial spaceflight industry four years ago. And the school has focused on nurturing the next generation of space industry talent.

“There are so many different types of careers at Kennedy Space Center, at Lockheed Martin. They’re not just hiring rocket scientists. They’re hiring managers who can communicate effectively with each other. They’re hiring electricians. hire people who know a trade,” said Rhonda Ripperger, South Lake Smart Lab Facilitator.

While some students can’t wait to take off, some see other ways to work in space. A curiosity aroused by the experiences and exposure to South Lake.

Teachers describe this as the beginning of the talent pool of bright minds they hope to stay in Brevard County or at least grow out of.

And further down that pipeline, south of Brevard, is Florida Tech. It was founded at the same time as NASA and has been preparing students for careers in space for decades. But it has gradually adapted to the current fast pace of the industry and rapid local expansion.

While schools and universities across the United States may have programs to train and teach their students to excel in the new era of the spaceflight industry, Brevard schools like Florida Tech are working their edge on the land with industry leaders right next door.

“We have a lot of alumni working at these companies, so they’re connected to the university. And because we’re nearby, there are more opportunities for networking and involvement,” said Dona Gaynor of Florida Tech.

Natalie Eustis has one of those opportunities. She is an intern at Boeing and worked on their Starliner capsule at Kennedy Space Center.

Even though the second-year biomedical engineering student wants to work on medical experiments in space, she says the close access gives her a head start.

“The objective is to train good engineers capable of solving problems. It’s something that all of these engineering companies, NASA and Boeing, Blue Origin, SpaceX, are all looking for people to troubleshoot and think about,” Eustis said.

Local schools and universities expect space companies looking for these problem solvers to look no further than Brevard’s local talent pool.

Share.

Comments are closed.